Login

Swedish Chamber of Commerce and Industry SCCJ

Home Features Archive 2017 SCCJ Interview: Ylva Johansson, Minister for Employment and Integration
Tuesday, 07 November 2017 23:04

SCCJ Interview: Ylva Johansson, Minister for Employment and Integration

Written by  Kjell Fornander

Ms. Johansson starts by explaining that she’s actually in Tokyo on her own initiative, to learn and to be inspired:

“Yes, this trip was my initiative. You see, there is currently a rather intense debate in Sweden, although maybe less than in some other countries, about how robots, automation, artificial intelligence, Internet-of-things and so on will impact the labor market in the future. Will work as we know it disappear? There is a real hunger for information. We also want to know how people in other countries think.

“Some people are optimistic about these changes; some are pessimistic. I’m one of the optimists. I don’t think that jobs will disappear. That said, I am convinced that we stand before major changes and many serious challenges. Basically, Swedish society is receptive to new technology. We tend to see it as a way to become more competitive, increase productivity, and improve the quality of both products and work itself. I think these technologies will lead to more interesting work.

“I’m not under the illusion that you can simply travel to another country and find the answers, but I think that you can learn, see new connections, and find inspiration. I call this my reconnaissance trip. Japan is interesting, not only because it’s at the forefront of many of these technologies, but also because of the country’s demographic situation.”

And what are your impressions so far?

“I’ve been here four days now. I’m about halfway through my program, and it’s been really interesting and very rewarding. I have met organizations, politicians, academics and business leaders. From today, I will start visiting companies and actual workplaces.

“I came to learn and to be inspired. But I quickly realized that there is also a great interest in Sweden, not least in my special field, which is gender equality in and outside of the labor market. Wherever I have been, this is what many have wanted to talk about.

“I’m certainly no expert on Japan, but I have seen many similarities with Swedish labor market practices, such as the role played by the labor unions. But I have also seen many differences. In Sweden, we strive for labor market flexibility underpinned by collective wage formation at the sector level.  Wages are kept at a uniform level, regardless of the profitability of individual companies.

“Our philosophy is that we should protect employees, but not the less profitable companies. Such companies must be allowed to fail. They should not be “subsidized” by being allowed to set lower salaries. What’s unique about Sweden is that all parties in the labor market, including the unions, have agreed to this approach. In the long term, this will increase the competitiveness of Swedish industry as a whole. And that, in turn, will make room for an ever better welfare system.” 

You have throughout your political career been heavily involved in issues regarding women in the labor market, and in society at large.

ylva koos

“Quite a few Japanese women seem to be aware of that. I have had many interesting discussions with Japanese women during my visit here. We have a very high female 

participation ratio for women in the Swedish workforce. I’m often asked how that’s possible. My answer is that there are three cornerstones in the Swedish system: individual taxation, childcare that is of high quality and universally available, and good elderly care.

“The last part is usually less talked about, but it’s equally important, for two reasons. One, it’s difficult for women to have careers if they also need to care for elderly parents or relatives. Two, parents generally do not want to be cared for by their children; they want to spend quality time with them in a way that preserves dignity. That means doing things together, eating out, going to the theater and so on, not just being cared for. We know this very well after numerous surveys in Sweden.”

One last question: Does everybody really have to work? That seems to be official policy in Sweden.

“Yes,” she answers without hesitation, before elaborating:

“There are two reasons. We know that men and women, at least in Sweden, generally live better lives in more equal relationships. They have better relations, they have more fun, they have more sex, (or at least, more children), and they divorce less. We know this to be true from many surveys. Having both partners earning money is a critical part of an equal relationship.

“Secondly, there is the societal point of view. A high standard of living and an inclusive, high-quality welfare system require a high degree of productivity. This in turn requires that as many people as possible are active members of the workforce.”


イルバヨハンソン雇用・社会統合相:インタビュー(文: シェル・フォルナンダー) 

SCCJインタビュー:イルバ・ヨハンソン雇用・社会統合相

イルバ・ヨハンソン雇用・社会統合相はスウェーデン政界の重鎮だ。ストックホルム近郊で教師として勤めた後に政界入りし、25年間にわたり幅広い分野の政策に携わってきた。SCCJは10月に来日した同相をホテルオークラにて取材することができた。

来日の目的は何よりも自分自身の知見を深めるため。

「今回の訪問は自分にとって重要なものでした。世界的に多くの国で議論されているように、スウェーデンでもロボットや自動化、人工知能、IoT等が将来の雇用状況に及ぼす影響について注目が高まっています。現時点で一般的な職業はなくなってしまうのか?情報は常に不足しています。他国の見解もぜひ参考にしてきたい」と彼女は説明する。

「将来の方向性については賛否両論あり、自分は楽観的な方。職業がなくなってしまうわけではなく、深刻な過渡期なのです。スウェーデンは従来、新しい技術に対して寛容な社会であり、競争力の強化や生産性の向上、製品やそれに携わる職業の質を高めるものと考える傾向にあります。技術とは、より仕事を面白くさせるものだと思います。 

他国に目を向けることで答えが見つかるとは思いませんが、何かを学ぶことはできます。新たな気づきやひらめきを得ることはできるでしょう。日本は技術先進国としてだけでなく、地理的な要素も非常に興味深い国です。」

日本の印象は?

「滞在4日目で言えることは、様々な組織、政治家、学者そしてビジネスリーダーと出会えたことがとても興味深く、多く知見を得られたということです。残りの数日間で企業や職業現場の視察に回ります。

自分が学ぶつもりで来日しましたが、実際にはスウェーデンに対する関心も高く、雇用に限らず一般的な意味での男女平等という私の専門分野に関する質問も多くいただきました。

日本の専門家ではありませんが、スウェーデンの雇用市場の現状と共通する点は多数あるようです。労働組合の役割などが良い例です。一方で、違いもあります。スウェーデンではセクターごとに給与水準を設定しながら雇用市場の柔軟性を模索しています。個々の企業の利益とは関係なく給与水準が定められています。

利益の少ない企業ではなく、従業員を守るべきという理念のもとに、景気の悪い企業は賃金を下げてまで他社の子会社化するのではなく、倒産すべきだという考えです。スウェーデンでは一般的に受け入れられている考えです。長期的には競争力の高い企業が多く生き残り、社会福祉により多く寄与できるのです。」

これまで長期にわたり取り上げてこられた雇用市場や社会的な場面での女性に関する課題について説明してください。

「この課題について意識の高い日本人女性も多いようですね。スウェーデンではビジネス社会で活躍する女性の比率が非常に高いですが、この背景には3つの要となるポイントがあります。①税制、②質が高く、十分な保育サービス、③質の高い高齢者サービスです。

高齢者サービスはあまり注目されていませんが、実は重要な要素です。まず、高齢の家族や親せきの介護をしなければならない場合、女性は仕事に打ち込みにくくなります。そして、親というものはできれば子供の世話にはなりたくないものです。プライドを保ちながら、自分たちにあった生活を楽しみたいのです。人の負担になるのではなく、一緒に何かをしたり、外食や舞台を楽しみたいのです。これに関しては非常に多くの調査がされてきました。」

最後の質問です。スウェーデンが政策に掲げているように、人は皆、働かなければいけないでしょうか。

「はい。その理由は2つ。少なくとも、スウェーデン社会では、男女の関係が平等であるほど、より良い生活を送れる傾向にあります。関係性も良く、楽しみも多く、セックスの回数も頻繁(もしくは、子だくさん)で離婚率が低いという調査結果があります。平等な関係を保つためにはそれぞれが収入を得ていることが重要です。

 次に、社会全体で見ても、生活水準が高く、質の高い福祉制度を維持するためには多くの人々が働く必要があります。」

ERICSSON FINNAIRGADELIUS IKEA SAABTetra Pak Volvo Cars.

Partners EBCJMECETP JAANlogo-footer