Login

Swedish Chamber of Commerce and Industry SCCJ

Home Features Archive 2017 SCCJ Interview: Minister Peter Eriksson
Sunday, 28 May 2017 17:00

SCCJ Interview: Minister Peter Eriksson

Written by  Dag Klingstedt

SCCJ Interview: Minister Peter Eriksson

peter eriksson 02

Peter Erikssons, Sweden’s Minister for Housing and Digital Development and former Spokesperson for the Green Party, was recently on a visit to Japan with the mission to strengthen the cooperation between our countries in the areas of digital development, sustainable smart cities and housing development utilising wood.SCCJ had the honour of hosting a breakfast meeting with the minister as our special guest, and we were also able to get some time with him afterwards for an interview. 

The meeting started out with a short speech by the minister, where he began by comparing the culture of Sweden and Japan, finding them very similar in many ways, making cooperation in fields such as digital development and housing both possible and desirable. He continued with providing an update to the general situation for the Swedish economy. Even though Europe experienced a bit of a shock in the form of Britain’s Brexit decision, Sweden is in good shape. “Even though we are running with a minority government, we have managed to form a broad coalition around ways to solve our problem issues, and it is clear that this is working well. Sweden’s economy is running at a very good clip, with one of the highest growth rates in the EU area for a number of years now. In fact, our employment rate is at 81%, the highest Eurostat number ever measured,” the minister said.

The present government has created some 150,000 new jobs since it was formed in late 2014, and the biggest problem for the country, according to Eriksson, is actually a lack of suitable personnel. “There is a matching problem, where the number of available jobs exceeds the number of suitably educated people, but we are catching up pretty quickly. More jobs obviously improves the economy, and our national debt is now down to around 30% of GDP and it continues to shrink, which means we are in a very good position to focus on improving our competitive strengths”, the minister said.

Another issue that Sweden is working on fixing is the relative lack of housing in expansive areas. There is a need for some 100,000 additional apartments, and the production has seen some significant ramping-up in scale in recent years. The production rate is now two to three times higher than it was three years ago, and gains have been achieved in the area of advanced industrial production of housing. Thanks to advances in construction technology, environmentally superior wooden housing with three to five stories is now possible.

 peter eriksson 03

After the breakfast meeting, we had a chance to sit down with the minister for a more intimate chat.

Q:  A number of years ago, the Swedish government offered tax incentives in order to allow for more people to purchase personal computers. This lead to an explosive growth in PC ownership and to a large increase in the interest in and knowledge of all things IT-related. Today we have new buzzwords like digitilisation and Big Data. Any thoughts on government initiatives to allow for a similar “big jump”?

A: Yes, we have most importantly launched a broadband strategy that is absolutely world class. By 2020, 95% of all Swedish households will have access to broadband internet with a speed of no less than 100 Mbit/s. By 2025, 100% of households should have access to fast broadband, with 98% having at least 1 Gbit/s, 1,9% having at least 100 Mbit/s and the remaining 0,1%, some 10,000 individuals living in very remote areas, having at least 30 Mbit/s. We are able to do this by using the smartest technology available to connect fibre networks with radio links in rural areas. We are investing some 5,5 billion SEK during the present term of office in order to create the infrastructure to make this a reality.

This initiative will create a very interesting Swedish market for solutions and service providers in many fields. One very important such field is telemedicine, where we want to provide the whole of Sweden with access to prompt healthcare. Many long trips to the hospital in rural areas can be avoided with check-ups made possible using broadband internet.

Q: There’s a lot of talk about the so-called “digital divide” where especially elderly people are being left behind due to a lack of education. Any thoughts about this?

A: Yes, that is clearly a problem that we are trying to solve as soon as possible. Sweden has a relatively speaking high level of IT literacy, also with older people, but the situation can and will be improved further.

Q: Germany has recently become known for its “Industry 4.0” initiative, where the country aims to digitilise its production industry. Anything similar happening in Sweden?

A: Yes, we call it “Smart Industry”. It is a cooperative project between government and industry with a similar aim to the German project. Our large manufacturing companies are very quickly gaining momentum in this area on their own, so we are concentrating on helping the smaller companies get up to speed here with different projects aimed at different parts of the industry.

Q: In Japan, Sweden is well-known for its generous immigration policy. Japan is not working in the same direction, being afraid of socioeconomic consequences with a large influx of refugees. In Sweden, immigrants are seen by some as a possible problem, but also viewed as an opportunity for the country. What are your thoughts?

A: By and large, immigration has been a clear positive for Swedish economy. We do see a higher rate of unemployment in areas with a larger number of immigrants, but this is rapidly shrinking now. The industry is crying out for labour and where government initiatives aren’t enough, many companies take matters into their own hands, offering inhouse Swedish education.

Q: The question of immigration obviously ties in with the question of an aging society, an acute problem in Japan.

A: Yes, the changing demographics of Japan is and will increasingly become a financial burden for Japan. Sweden is getting older, too, and we see immigration as one way to compensate for this. Many newcomers are more than willing to work hard to become supporting members of society.

With many new citizens arriving, we do have a problem with housing, though, and this is something we want to remedy as soon as possible. The government has allotted 6 billion SEK to new housing development, and we are now building 65,000 new flats during this term of office, compared with 20-25,000 during the last term.

Q: This is you first visit to Japan. Any first impressions?

A: Well, perhaps the fact that everything is so clean and orderly. Sweden is not bad in this respect, but Japan is clearly in a league of its own. I wonder if this is an entirely good thing, though.. Perhaps the Japanese are a bit too disciplined? Still, it is impressive and gratifying to see how the Japanese people seem to do everything with great pride

peter eriksson 04

SCCJインタビュー:ペーテル・エリクソン スウェーデン住宅・デジタル開発担当大臣

 スウェーデンの住宅・デジタル開発担当大臣で緑の党の報道担当でもあるペーテル・エリクソン氏が先日、デジタル開発や木材を活用した持続可能なスマートシティと住宅開発の分野において日本との協力関係を強化・促進するために来日した。SCCJでは同大臣を囲み、ブレックファーストミーティングを開催、その後、個別にインタビューを行った。

 大臣は開催の言葉としてスウェーデンと日本の文化には多くの共通点があることからデジタル/住宅開発における協力関係を築いていく余地が大いにあると指摘した。

 また、最近のスウェーデン経済について、欧州では英国のEU離脱が波紋を広げたものの、スウェーデンの状況は安定しているとした。「スウェーデンは小国ではあるが、多方との同盟が様々な問題を解決するために功をなしている。経済も堅調で、EU諸国の中でも高い成長率を維持しており、就業率もユーロスタットの統計では最高となる81%だ」と説明した。

現在の政府は2014年の発足以来、15万人もの新規雇用を創出している。一方で、問題となっているのは適切な人材が不足している点だという。「求人に対して、適材が不足しているため人材育成に注力している。仕事があるということは経済成長に不可欠だ。スウェーデンの国債は今やGDPの30%程度で順調に縮小している。今後も国際的な競争力を高めていく力は十分にあるといえる」。

 人材不足の他に課題となっているのが住宅不足だ。近年は建設が進んでいるとはいえ、まだ10万戸ほど不足している。建設量は3年前の2~3倍で、住宅の先進工業国としての発展が進んでいる。最近の建設技術では3~5階建ての木材建築も可能となってきた。木材の活用で環境への影響も改善される。

 勉強会に続き、SCCJは以下の点について個別に伺った。

 SCCJ:スウェーデン政府は以前、個人のパソコン購入を促進するために特別な税制措置をとった。これにより、パソコン所有率が爆発的に伸び、ITに対する人々の関心が強まった。最近では「デジタライゼーション」や「ビッグデータ」といった言葉が使われるようになっている。今後、同様の「大きな変化」を狙うような政策はあるのか?

 PE:はい、世界的にも最先端のブロードバンド戦略を打ち出している。2020年までに全国95%の世帯で100Mbit/s以上のブロードバントが普及する計画だ。2025にはすべての世帯で高速ブロードバンドが利用可能になり、98%以上がGbit/s、1.9%が100 Mbit/s以上のスピードでインターネットを利用できるようになる。残りの0.1%は辺地に居住する約1万人で、最低でも30 Mbit/sのスピードを確保できる予想となっている。このためには55億SEKの予算を投じて辺地ではファイバーネットワークと無線リンクを繋ぐなどの対策を進めている。

 この試みにより、新たなソリューション/サービスプロバイダー市場がスウェーデンに誕生するだろう。例えば、全国に必要なヘルスケアサービスを提供する遠隔医療により、わざわざ遠い距離を移動して受診する必要がなくなる。

 SCCJ:パソコンやインターネットの利用能力・機会が異なる人々の間に情報格差(デジタルデバイド)が生じるともいわれている。この点についてはどう思うか。

 PE:スウェーデンは比較的、高いITリテラシーを実現していますが、これは重要な問題として捉えています。今後も改善に向けて対策を練っていきます。

 SCCJ:ドイツ政府の戦略的プロジェクトとしてモノづくりの高度化を目指す「インダストリー4.0」が挙げられる。スウェーデンでもこのような試みはあるのか。

 PE:はい。「スマート・インダストリー」という政府と企業の協業プロジェクトがあり、ドイツ同様に高度な産業を目指している。国内の大手企業は急速に進化しているので、政府としては小規模企業がそれぞれの分野で発展していけるよう支援している。

 SCCJ:スウェーデンは移民に対して寛容であることがよく知られている。日本では逆に社会経済への影響を恐れて消極的だ。スウェーデンでも賛否両論となっているが、エリクソン大臣はどう思うか。

 PE:結論から言えば、スウェーデン経済にとって移民の受け入れは良いことだったといえる。移民の多い地域では失業率も高くなっているが、これも減少をみせている。産業界では人材不足となっており、政府による対策が滞っている場合は、企業自身が社内研修を行う事例もある。

 SCCJ:移民問題は高齢化社会が抱える問題とも関係します。

 PE:これは日本にとっては深刻な問題といえる。スウェーデンも高齢化が進んでおり、移民の受け入れにより多少の高齢化解消を狙っているともいえる。多くの移民は懸命に働き、社会を支えようとしている。国民が増える一方で、住宅の不足が浮き彫りになってきた。早急に解決したい課題だ。住居新築に向けて政府は2,000億SEKの予算を確保している。前期の2万~2.5万戸に比べて、現在の任期中には6.5万戸を新設予定だ。

 SCCJ:初めての来日ということだが、日本の印象は?

 PE:とても清潔で整備されている。スウェーデンも悪くはないが、日本ほどではない。日本人は規則に縛られすぎているのでは…とも疑問に思うが、日本人が様々なことに対して誇りをもって向き合っていることは素晴らしい。

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ERICSSON FINNAIRGADELIUS IKEA SAABTetra Pak Volvo Cars.

Partners EBCJMECETP JAANlogo-footer