Login

SCCJ Swedish Chamber of Commerce and Industry

Home Features Archive 2017 SCCJ Interview: Stefan Ingves - Governor of the Swedish Central Bank
Monday, 06 February 2017 13:26

SCCJ Interview: Stefan Ingves - Governor of the Swedish Central Bank

Written by  Kjell Fornander

SCCJ Interview: Stefan Ingves - Governor of Swedish Central Bank

 (日本語テキストは英語の後に続きます)

Stefan Ingves, known to all Swedes as the powerful governor of the Riksbank (the Swedish Central Bank), recently visited Tokyo as part of a delegation from the bank's General Council (Riksbanksfullmäktige). SCCJ News had the opportunity to sit down with the patient Governor to get answers to the questions you were always too embarrassed to ask.

Stefan Ingves low 140918 resized no2

SSCCJ News (SN): What's the main difference between the Riksbank and the Japanese Central Bank?

Stefan Ingves (SI): Actually, when it comes down to the nuts and bolts - the craftsmanship of day-to-day financial management - there is no big difference between how things are done here, there, or in any other developed economy.

Krönika nr 19. Bild 1. Södra Bancohuset vid Järntorget i gamla stan Stockholm.

Swedish Central Bank 1680. Photo from Erik Dahlberg Suecia Antiqua et Hodierna.

But, of course, most central banks have a long history: the Japanese central bank is about 150 years old*, if my memory serves me right. The Swedish Riksbank will be 350 years old next year. When an institution has been in business for that long, it naturally carries some baggage. The economic environment is also different from country to country, but the craftsmanship is basically the same. We central bankers can usually quite easily talk to each other.

SN: There hasn't been much economic development in Japan for almost 30 years now. Is the Bank of Japan doing something wrong?

SI: It's not really a question of what the Bank of Japan does or does not do. From my experience, the Bank has a very good understanding of the problems Japan is facing: a shrinking workforce that has to support a rapidly aging population, as well as the automation and manufacturing industries shifting production overseas. These are problems Japan shares with other developed economies. Each country has to solve these problems in its own way. It's politics, and it takes time. But it's not a lack of understanding at the Bank of Japan that is the problem.

SN: But in Sweden we seem to react much quicker to crises.

SI: That's because we have to. A small, exporting economy like Sweden's has to react very quickly if we want to protect our standard of living. Exports comprise around 50% of Sweden's GNP. If we make the wrong decision, we'll see the result quickly. We'll simply run out of money much faster than a huge economy like the Japanese.

Our very high standard of living comes from the fact that we constantly tweak, adapt, and fine-tune. We try something, and if it doesn't work, we try something else. Structural changes are never ever easy. But in a small, open economy you usually see the results immediately. You'll notice directly if you made the right or wrong decision.

SN: Are the Swedish more flexible?

SI: I think there is a high degree of acceptance of change among the Swedish. We, too, have tried to protect important industries, like our shipyards in the 70s and the textile industry. And, as we all know, it didn't work very well. Small, open economies learn quickly to accept change. We have learnt that it's better to support people and to help them into new industries, rather than to try to save industries without a future.

 repo rate no2

             Swedish Repo Rate. Source: Swedfish Central Bank

SN: Negative interest rates in Japan have lead people to keep their money under the tatami mat rather than in the bank. Is it the same thing in Sweden?

SI: In this case, you can't compare Sweden and Japan. In Sweden, there is less and less demand for cash. The circulation of coins and notes is quickly shrinking. This change is totally technology-driven, especially among younger generations, which prefer the convenience of electronic money and payments via mobile phone, or from phone to phone. Today, digital money is completely dominant in Sweden.

bank notes cirkulation

         Swedish Bank Notes Circulation. Source: Swedish Central Bank

Usually, cash in circulation increases in an expanding economy. Sweden is a rare example of the opposite. The amount of cash topped some five or six year ago at around 100 -115 billon SEK. Today, the amount in circulation is about 60 billion SEK. The rest is digital money.

SN: Why do we have negative interest rates?

SI: Interest rates are low all over the world today, with negative rates in many parts of the world. Sweden is not free to set its own rates; we have to go with the flow.

 swedish cpi no2

              Swedish CPI / Inflation. Source: Swedish Central Bank

SN: But what's wrong with a world without inflation? And why 2%?

SI: It's about the stability in the economic system. Every economy needs a certain level of inflation. Deflation creates instability. If you don't know whether prices will go up or down tomorrow, you will have to focus too much energy on non-productive issues.

Think of it as electricity. If you woke up every morning not knowing whether the outlet would deliver 220, 100, or 175 volts, you would spend hours every morning trying to protect your toaster. It's the same with inflation. A reasonable level of inflation creates a stable playground for economic activities, where the players can focus on more important things than prices.

However, inflation doesn't have an intrinsic value, and 2% is not a scientific figure. It comes from a generally accepted best practice: a level as small as possible, but still with a safe enough distance from zero and the dangers of deflation.

*Note: According to Bank of Japan website, they have started operation in 1882 and are now in the 135th year

 

ステファン・イングヴェス氏インタビュー

 

スウェーデン国立銀行リクスバンク総裁ステファン・イングヴェス氏が同行評議会の視察のため来日しました。SCCJ Newsも取材を申し込み、中央銀行のありかたやその活動について基本的な話を伺ってきました。

 SCCJ News (SN):中央銀行としてのリクスバンクと日本銀行の主な違いはなんですか?

 イングヴェス氏(SI):経済が発展している社会においては、金融機関の通常業務にはそれほど大きな違いはありません。もちろん、それぞれの機関が長い歴史の中で培ってきた要素は異なります。私の記憶が正しければ日本銀行の歴史は150年※、リクスバンクは来年(2018年)で350年を迎えます。長い年月とともに、それぞれ背負うものが生じてくるでしょう。しかし、国ごとの経済環境が異なっても、基本的な業務は類似しているため、中央銀行で働く人々は国が違えど、互いにある程度理解をしながら話しをすることができます。

 SN:日本ではこの30年程、経済成長が低迷気味ですが、日本銀行を要因とする問題点があるのでしょうか。

 SI:中央銀行の過ちというよりも、日本が直面している社会的変動(例えば高齢化社会を支えるべき労働人口の減少や産業拠点の国外シフトなど)にどう対応するかが課題となっています。これは多くの先進国に共通する課題であり、それぞれが独自の方法で糸口を探っていかなければなりません。政治的であり長期的な努力が必要です。中央銀行だけの問題ではないのです。

 SN:スウェーデンの方が日本よりも素早く危機に対応しているように感じます。

 SI:スウェーデンのような小さな輸出国は経済を守るために俊敏な対策が必要だからです。輸出業はGNPの約50%を占めています。間違った判断を下せば、即座に問題が生じます。日本のような経済大国に比べれば、あっという間に破産しかねないのです。

 スウェーデンが高い生活水準を維持できている背景には、必要に応じて様々な観点での微調整を繰り返している点が挙げられます。ある案を試してみてうまくいきそうになければ、別の策を練る。国家にとって政策等の変更は容易ではありません。しかし、経済的に開かれた小国であればすぐに結果を導き出せるため、政策に対する評価が出しやすいといえます。

 SN:スウェーデンの方がより柔軟ということですね。

 SI:スウェーデンの方が変化に柔軟といえるかもしれません。70年代には造船や織物産業を守ろうと、変化を避けようとした過去もあります。しかし、それらがうまくいかなかったのは周知の事実です。そこで、我々は将来性のない産業に執着するよりも、新しい産業を切り開いていくことで人々の生活や国の発展を促進させることが重要だと学びました。

 SN:日本のマイナス金利政策によって銀行の預金額の減少が懸念されています。スウェーデンでも同じような問題はあるのでしょうか。

 SI:この問題に関しては両国を比較することはできません。スウェーデンでは現金需要が縮小しており、実際に取引に使われるコインや紙幣の量は急速に減少しています。これは特に、若い世代を中心としたテクノロジーの発展による変化で、人々は現金よりも電子マネーやモバイル端末による支払いを好むようになりました。つまり、スウェーデンではデジタルマネーが圧倒的に普及しているということです。

 通常、経済の発展とともに市場の現金流通量は増加するのですが、スウェーデンではその逆の珍しい現象が起きています。この流通量は5-6年前の1,000-1,115億SEKから減少を続けており、現在は600億SEKとなっています。減少分はデジタルマネーに置き換わったということです。

 SN:なぜスウェーデンにはマイナス金利があるのでしょうか?

 SI:低金利は世界的な現象であり、マイナス金利も珍しくありません。スウェーデンは国際社会の傾向に逆らって独自の金利を設定するわけにはいかないということです。

 SN:しかし、インフレのない状況の何が問題なのでしょうか?目標インフレ率2%の理由は?

 SI:経済システムの安定性がカギとなってきます。経済においてある程度のインフレは不可欠な要素であり、デフレは経済状況を乱しかねません。物価変動の見込みが不透明ということは非常に危険な状況だといえます。

 電気を例に考えてみましょう。日々の電量が不確定だと、「今日は220ボルトだろうか?それとも100?いや175?」と不安を感じながら家電がショートするリスクを抱きつつ使用しなければなりません。インフレも同じことです。人々が物価よりももっと重要な要素に集中できるような経済環境を整えるために安定したインフラは必要だといえます。

 しかし、インフレ事態には実体的な価値はなく、2%というのも大げさな数値ではありません。これまでの経済状況を加味しながら、インフレ率もデフレのリスクもできる限り低く狙ったのが2%という数値です。

 ※ 日本銀行の公式サイトによると1882年業務開始のため2017年時点で135年になります。

ERICSSON FINNAIRGADELIUS IKEA SAABTetra Pak Volvo Cars.

Partners EBCJMECETP JAANlogo-footer